Into the Storm – Film Review

Into the Storm

In a small US town the world’s biggest storm, like ever, is brewing. Death and destruction are everywhere but luckily it is all caught on camera in this found footage drama hoping to distract you from its shortcoming with special effects and shaky camerawork.

Found footage films live and die by how convincingly they integrate the fact that the format requires a character to be filming the action at all times. Into the Storm has a good try by installing a storm-chasing documentary crew at the centre of the story but falls apart when focussing on regular civilians. A major plot thread involves a father and two sons; one of whom is helping a classmate film a video and the other is shooting their school’s graduation day for a video time capsule. It’s difficult to accept that when lives are at risk and your sibling is drowning that they don’t abandon the cameras in favour of actually doing something useful. I assume the initial impetus behind making this a found footage film, aside from creating some distinction between it and Twister, is to immerse the audience in the action and make the film more believable but the contrivance of the cameras only serves to highlight the artifice of the film and increase the ridiculousness of the whole endeavor.

Camera-holding nonsense aside Into the Storm really is below par. The characters are a collection of either unconvincing, unlikeable, or forgettable tropes who deliver dialogue that doesn’t quite come across as human. Richard Armitage stars as the unreasonable father of two bland teens who over the course of the film learns to respect his wayward son and generally like the second. Meanwhile the usually flawless Matt Walsh plays the lead storm-chaser and token asshole who acts as proxy antagonist for the storm. Sarah Wayne Callies takes up the thankless task of being the sole female character with any character, a storm data expert that seemingly relies on the weather forecast for tips. Callies repeatedly says that she shouldn’t have abandoned her daughter to take this job and fails to provide a decent reason why she did. One character in particular got such a short shrift in the story (say that quickly three times) then when he popped up in the end I genuinely did not recognise him. Presumably this was a token-camera-holding-individual rather than someone I was supposed to care about.

Into the Storm 1

Visually and tonally the film reminded me a lot of the entertaining Final Destination 5 which makes sense as they share a director in Steven Quale. Sadly while the Final Destination franchise is famed for its spectacular deaths and wry sense of humour neither can be found in Into the Storm. Everyone is taking the situation too seriously, including the director, aside from two “comedic” aspiring YouTube stars whose contributions to the film I would rather forget.

The other experience Into the Storm brought to mind is the cheesy scene-setting films you might be shown while waiting for a themed ride at Thorpe Park. You stand for an hour queuing while various screens show you out of work actors pretending to be in the midst of a natural disaster before you board a rollercoaster vaguely simulating what they were describing. Sadly Into the Storm does not end in a thrill ride, although the large screen and shaky camera did bring about nausea, instead ending with saccharin moments of reflection and reconciliation.

After ninety minutes of admittedly impressive visual effects and disappointingly poor human beings I was tired and had a sick feeling in my stomach. If you are to take a gamble and see Into the Storm then the big screen is definitely the place to do so as on TV it will only be less engaging. On the whole I advise avoiding this one unless you find watching people driving towards, pointing at, and then running away from tornadoes irresistible.

Into the Storm is in UK cinemas now.

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